When Pay Does Not Motivate — How to Groom Great Employees

23 Dec

When Pay Does Not Motivate — How to Groom Great Employees

Yes, our employees expect to be paid fairly, so as not to create unneeded contention that they are underpaid, but over-paying employees does little to motivate them to work harder toward achieving company goals.

 

If you have been looking for a fresh take on how to motivate your employees go pick up a copy of Daniel Pink’s book, Drive — The Surprising Truth About What Motivates Us. You will want to keep this book in your desk drawer as a reference when trying to motivate your employees toward achieving company goals. Pink makes a convincing argument that money does not motivate the people that work for us. Yes, our employees expect to be paid fairly, so as not to create unneeded contention that they are underpaid, but over-paying employees does little to motivate them to work harder toward achieving company goals.

Moving into 2017, here are four ways to motivate employees without increasing salaries:

Verbal Appreciation

There is no better motivator than appreciation. Often, by simply showing your appreciation for someone’s hard work, drive, enthusiasm or work ethic, your acknowledgment encourages more of the positive behavior you are seeking. In today’s over-worked world of business, it is not that managers and business owners don’t appreciate the hard work their employees put in, it’s that we forget to express that appreciation. Simply saying, “Thank you for your hard work,” can go a long way.

Meaningful Reward.

Take extra effort because you need to know the people that work for you. To offer meaningful rewards you need to know their favorite restaurants, hobbies, artists and other fine details about their lives. Then, when they least expect it, reward your employee for work well done with a gift that is deeply personal and meaningful to them.

Let Go

As Daniel Pink shares in his book, generally people are more motivated to work harder when they have the ability to work on their own terms. Share your goals with your employees, then lend them some, if not all, of the authority to decide how the goal will be accomplished. Managers and business owners who are controlling tend to groom employees who are less productive as they are afraid to move forward without constant approval.

Listen   

When was the last time you really listened to your employees? Is it possible that they have a perfect solution to some big company challenge you are facing? Not just in business, but in life too, there’s no greater compliment than lending your ear to the people around you. Listen to the ideas of your people, implement when possible, and you will create an army of employees who feel empowered to move the company toward those big, audacious company goals, which you always thought were solely yours to focus on.

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